HomeNewsFeaturesDisplay

OUR OWN HOMETOWN HERO

Brig. Gen. Steven Gregg, Commander of the Oregon Air National Guard, presents the Bronze Star to Senior Master Sergeant Timothy Lear, 142nd Security Forces Squadron, on Aug. 3, 2012.  Lear received the medal for “extraordinary leadership” while being assigned to the 966th Air Expeditionary Squadron, Baghram Air Base, Afghanistan.  (U.S. Air Force Photograph by Master Sgt. Shelly Ball, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs)

Brig. Gen. Steven Gregg, Commander of the Oregon Air National Guard, presents the Bronze Star to Senior Master Sergeant Timothy Lear, 142nd Security Forces Squadron, on Aug. 3, 2012. Lear received the medal for “extraordinary leadership” while being assigned to the 966th Air Expeditionary Squadron, Baghram Air Base, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force Photograph by Master Sgt. Shelly Ball, 142nd Fighter Wing Public Affairs)

Portland Air National Guard Base, Portland, Ore. -- Senior Master Sergeant Timothy Lear, 142nd Security Forces Squadron, Oregon Air National Guard was awarded a Bronze Star Medal on Aug. 3, 2012. Lear received the medal for "extraordinary leadership" while being assigned to the 966th Air Expeditionary Squadron, Baghram Air Base, Afghanistan, from October 14, 2011 to April 17, 2012.

Serving as the First Sergeant for the 966th, he held himself and others to the highest standard of excellence during his deployment. "The whole Bronze Star thing is not about me, because without the troops who are deployed, none of this would even be taking place," said Lear.

While deployed he served and mentored over 2,300 airmen during Operation Enduring Freedom's deadliest year-to-date. He endured numerous hazards from 40 hostile fire incidents to five attacks in transit of the battle space. He provided direct assistance with the Ordnance Disposal teams' to capture 4,000 pounds of confiscated explosives saving the lives of friendly combatant forces and possibly many of our own members assigned to his unit.

He also ensured that 4,500 pounds of care packages and supplies were distributed to even the most remote areas in Afghanistan to spread morale where it was truly needed.

Lear found his leadership role humbling at times and the leadership position he was entrusted with during his deployment. "If you aren't 110 percent committed to your job and to the troops around you, then don't deploy," said Lear.

As a full-time police officer with Washington State's Vancouver Police Department, Lear has been in the military since 1983 and a drill status guardsman for more than 11 years.